Mitchell Joachim

Designing a city is like going to the gym. You need a vision and a plan for its ideal physique.

TED Fellow and Urban Designer

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Mitchell Joachim | TED Fellow and Urban Designer
Lavin Exclusive Speaker

Architect and designer Mitchell Joachim tackles the urban issues redefining our built environments and cities: his work boldly reassesses the way humans live together in the 21st Century. In mind-bending talks, Joachim envisions a future in which biology and architecture are a single discipline—and shares the ground-breaking work and disruptive ideas that will make that future a reality. 

A TED Fellow and partner at Planetary ONE, Mitchell Joachim adapts sustainable ecological principles to new developments in architecture, transportation, and environmental planning. Joachim is also the Co-President of Terreform ONE, where he develops new technologies for local sustainability in energy, transportation, infrastructure, buildings, waste treatment, food, water, and media spaces. His work offers the sheer excitement of opening minds to new ways of literally building the future.

 

Joachim's projects are disruptive but also practical. His work on the MIT Smart Cities Car (which Time called the Best Invention of 2007) pushed the envelope of urban mobility in an intelligent way, while his Fab Tree Lab (which was exhibited at MoMA) uses grafted cells to erect structures—and to rethink the way we build.

 

Mitchell Joachim is an Associate Professor at both NYU and the European Graduate School, and was the Frank Gehry Chair at the University of Toronto. He has been selected for Wired's 2008 Smart List (“15 People the Next President Should Listen To”) as well as Rolling Stone's 100 Agents of Change. In 2010, Popular Science named him as a visionary, envisioning “The Future of the Environment.”   

Speech Topics

Cities
The Organic City Urbanism Redefined
Mitchell Joachim inspires us to rethink our approach to urban environments by pointing to mind-bending technologies that are already transforming the way we live. When the elevator was introduced, the nature of buildings changed. The same shift occurred for cities built in response to widespread car traffic. Today, Joachim is working on the next big shift. It could be an intelligent “soft” car that networks with a city grid. It might involve grafting living cells into green residences that can reverse the last 150 years of inefficient living. Joachim envisions a future in which biology and architecture are a single discipline—and shares the ground-breaking work and disruptive ideas that will make that future a reality.