Jeff Rubin

Is globalization, as we know it, coming to an end?

Economist and Author of The End of Growth and The Carbon Bubble

Request Booking Info
Jeff Rubin | Economist and Author of The End of Growth and The Carbon Bubble

Not many Canadian-based economic experts can boast a sterling worldwide reputation. But Jeff Rubin can. Rubin is the author of Why Your World is About To Get a Whole Lot Smaller, a bestselling book about how the rising cost of oil is changing business; The End of Growth, which argues that the end of cheap oil means the end of economic growth; and his new title The Carbon Bubble, about Canada’s economic future. His panoramic talks are for anyone interested in understanding massive changes in the global economy.

Jeff Rubin is an internationally-renowned economist—a trusted voice on the future of oil and energy and how they relate to the economic outlook. His critically hailed book Why Your World is About to Get a Whole Lot Smaller is a must-read, not simply for people in oil-related industries, but for anyone interested in understanding the future of every industry. His next book, The End of Growth, paints a picture of our economic future, where the end of cheap oil brings an end to endless economic growth. His new book is The Carbon Bubble, which addresses Canada’s national economic future—and the financial security of all Canadians.

 

His insights appear regularly on the front page of The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, and he is a fixture in the media (ABC, CNN), where he comments on federal budgets and other key economic events with a candor and a level of insight rarely matched by economic experts. From 1992-2009, Rubin was Chief Economist at CIBC World Markets, where he made headlines at home, and earned a solid international reputation for his prescient calls on oil prices and their economic impacts. Rubin also penned a Globe and Mail column, Ahead of the Curve.   

Speech Topics

Global Economy
Oil and the End of Globalization

Once the economy recovers, oil prices will skyrocket—and globalization, as we know it, may end. What will our world look like then, and how will we continue to prosper? Today, almost everything we use is made possible, in some way, by abundantly available oil. But oil reserves are disappearing, never to return. Consequently, international trade and long distance driving, among other things, will become luxuries. But from this new reality, Rubin offers a vital account of how we can all benefit if we act now. In this new world, industries, such as steel and agriculture, will be revitalized; carbon tariffs will increase productivity; mass transit will be rethought; and our communities and the human spirit will be strengthened. Looking to the end of oil, and globalization, Rubin is both passionate and practical in outlining opportunities—opportunities that are endless and endlessly hopeful.