• aboutlavin

About Lavin

THE LAVIN AGENCY is the world’s largest intellectual talent agency, representing leading thinkers for speaking engagements, personal appearances, consulting, and endorsements.

As a speakers bureau, we only work with an elite group of active C-Level executives, scientists, economists, journalists, academics, and public intellectuals. All of our clients have day jobs, which means they have front line experience and their presentations are constantly being refreshed by new ideas. We do not work with professional speakers, ex-athletes, or ex-anything. Only thinkers and doers who are changing the world for the better. Over 50 of our clients have spoken at TED, and many are people we discovered long before they had a million+ views on TED.com.

For keynotes on technology, education, the arts, social justice, science, innovation, or any other topic or industry, The Lavin Agency offers the ideas that are changing the world.

Our Team

“We have a remarkable team here, and one reason is that the staff is very diverse, politically and intellectually. I like people who want to contribute to the debate. At The Lavin Agency, what we’re trying to do is add to the conversation, because great ideas often come from conflicting ideas that are looking for the truth. We're never going to find the truth, of course, but if we’re trying to find it, chances are that things will be better today than they were last week. That's the quality—a searching quality—that is present in everyone who works here. 

“One of the questions I ask potential employees is, Who do you think is underrated? I don’t necessarily care what the answer is, but I do want to know that someone has a critical faculty and a passion they can articulate. That they have the ability to say, This idea is better than this idea—and here’s why. A key aspect of working at The Lavin Agency is being able to say that we have a speaker who is better than these other speakers, for these specific reasons. If you are willing to go out on a limb for one speaker over another, and be willing to admit that you have taste and judgement and the ability to use them, then you’re going to fit in here just fine!” — David Lavin 

David Lavin

President & CEO

Erin Cechetto

Chief of Staff

Erin holds an International MBA as well as a BA in theatre. In her free time, she loves to travel (36 countries and counting!), work out, read, and try new restaurants.

Charles Yao

Executive Vice President—Director of Intellectual Talent

Charles works closely with David to bring on new speakers, and is the point of contact—the relationships guy—for most of our exclusives. Outside of Lavin, he is the art director of Little Brother, the National Magazine Award-winning literary journal.

Tom Gagnon

Executive Vice President

Tom joined the agency in 1998, and has enjoyed the challenging opportunity of working with, and representing, some of the Western world’s most influential figures. He lives in New Hampshire with his wife, son and the world’s most talented dog.

Gord Mazur

Executive Vice President

Exiled to New York in 2011 when one too many donuts went missing from the fridge in the Toronto office. The NYC staff is tired of him deriding the vegan selection in their fridge and has petitioned David to open an office in Iceland.

Cathy Hirst

Executive Vice President, West Coast

Cathy has acquired more than 27 years experience as a speakers agent, and is actively involved in the meeting planning industry through her relationships with CSAE, MPI and others within the community.

Kenneth Calway

Executive Vice President

Ken Calway is paid to have thoughts. This bio was invented while drinking beer after a long day at work. Drew Dudley is partly to blame.

Sally Itterly

Vice President

Personal philosophy: Work hard, laugh harder, and take every opportunity to dance like nobody’s watching.

Holly Caracappa

Vice President

Holly arrived at Lavin after turns in opera and finance. A paradox incarnate, she performs classical music, studies sacred geometry and practices tonic herbalism in the (post-post) modern abyss. Holding degrees from Peabody Conservatory and Johns Hopkins, she’d rather hold the grail.

Marc Rutherford

Vice President

With nearly twenty years of talent management between Toronto and Los Angeles, Marc has spent his career at the forefront of emerging talent and trends. Always willing to go the extra mile for his talent and clients, Marc takes great pride in seeing the projects he’s involved in come to fruition.

Sumin George


Sumin is a sales and marketing professional with an extensive background in languages and education. She brings a myriad of skills and talents to her work at Lavin, liaising with new and existing clients around the world.

Lindsay Ogus

Apprentice Agent

Lindsay is an avid debater, natural collaborator, writer, and passionate communicator with a thirst for knowledge and a deep love for problem-solving. Crosswords over Netflix.

Mattie Mould

Sales Associate

Mattie is an Aussie with a background in advertising and journalism. She got lost in Canada amid her search for decent snow, thinks hockey is played on grass and that +10°C is freezing.

Elizabeth Chatzky

Business Development Agent

Elizabeth Chatzky is a biz-dev agent (and admin. extraordinaire) at Lavin NYC. She’s held this role for two years after graduating with a business degree from a small liberal-arts college. In her spare time she enjoys running through Central Park and cooking whatever recipes Food52 has to offer.

Pamela Smith

Agent (On Leave)

At 5’10, Pamela always has the advantage to see the speaker at the podium. She has been an Agent with Lavin since 2013, and enjoys working with our fantastic speakers and clients. Pamela likes to steal the weekly journals from Charles' desk, but since being off on maternity leave has had to settle for online subscriptions.

Leslie Tarulli

Agent (On Leave)

Leslie came to the Lavin Agency fulfilled from a life onstage as a ballerina, from which she brings a passion for live performance. She is currently at home with a new baby girl, prepping her for early admission to Hogwarts.

Spencer Gordon

Marketing Writer

Spencer has worked as a prof, an SEO wrangler, a dry cleaner, a pro wrestler, and more. He wrote a book called Cosmo (Coach House, ’12) and should have a few more coming soon. He edits the decade-old literary magazine The Puritan and is the father of a coonhound named BobSnow.

Byron Chan

Media Co-Ordinator

Byron is our Marketing Producer, and his work ranges from videotaping keynotes to using PicMonkey. He also enjoys slow walks by the beach.

Simon Marsello

Marketing Assistant

In-house blogger, music/sports/geography geek, sandwich enthusiast. Occasionally amuses people by playing the mandolin. Can name more Prime Ministers of Canada than is socially acceptable.

Amee Bhavsar

Sales & Marketing Coordinator

Writer-extraordinaire and Sherlock Holmes of NYC, Amee has been with Lavin since August 2013. Outside of the office, Amee is pursuing a master’s in media studies and practices her life-long love of dance, running, yoga, and curating delicious meals in her kitchen. Note: she’s recently hit guac-bottom.

Alex Hamlyn

Sales & Marketing Coordinator

Alex works closely with David and Charles. He has a background in journalism and spends most of his spare time playing music. He’s toured across Canada and slept on floors in 7 out of the 10 provinces.

Alana Leprich

Sales & Marketing Coordinator

Alana is a marketing coordinator by day, and a musician and DJ by night. She comes to the Lavin Agency from a background in arts organizations. When she’s not working, she’s playing shows, organizing parties, and having too much fun.

Stacey Wickens

Senior Events Coordinator

With a background in public relations, Stacey has a knack for communicating and building relationships. Outside of the office, you’ll find her attempting to master Pilates or sitting in left field at a Blue Jays game.

Jessica Dolman

Senior Events Coordinator

An English transplant in Toronto, who’s worked at Lavin since ’05.  When she's not ensuring her speakers' events are successful, she’s a TFC and Jays fan who loves travelling, seeing friends, curling, enjoying good food and wine. She’s even picked ice wine grapes in −12°C/10°F!

Mark Mizzoni

Events Coordinator

Mark has a background in live bookings, artist management, publicity and radio promotion, and manages a roster of exclusive Canadian speakers here at Lavin. He enjoys working closely with speakers and event sponsors on all the important details.

Alex Ernst

Events Coordinator

As an event coordinator, Alex cherishes the relationships forged with our speakers, the best in the world. He enjoys the writing of John le Carré, Matt Taibbi, and the science community at large. His spirit animal is a polar bear.

Alaina Slavec

Events Coordinator

Alaina reads too many books, watches too much TV and has an unrestrained love for potatoes. When she’s not working with speakers, you'll find her playing the piano and debating the ins and outs of Game of Thrones.

Maisa Leibovitz

Events Coordinator

Maisa came to Canada by way of Brazil almost 10 years ago, and she never left. Maisa joined Lavin following stints with the Pan-American Games, and Just for Laughs Comedy Fest, where she proved herself more than capable of wrangling the big demands and finer responsibilities of major events. In her spare time Maisa eats chips and waters her plants.

Daniela Parra

Events Coordinator

Daniela was born in Caracas, Venezuela, and loves travel, languages, sunny days, spicy food, and cute animals. Her favorite part about being an Event Coordinator is getting to work on unique international events, and connecting with people from all backgrounds.

Linda Cook


Linda is so happy to have been part of the Lavin team since 2011. The Finance Team rocks! As the keeper of all things financial, Linda can help you out with any questions.

Joan Hogan

Intermediate Accountant

One of our fantastic accountants, Joan’s coming up to her 8th year here at Lavin. Her hobbies include reading, crafts, gardening, and baking. All her pets are of the human variety: children and grandchildren!

Kerri-Ann Malone

Intermediate Accountant

Kerri-Ann is the newest member of the finance team; her enthusiasm, professionalism, positive attitude and infectious smile are the foundation of her personality, and make her a pleasure to work with and be around. In her spare time, she enjoys crafting, cooking, baking, and gardening.

Ellen Louie

Receptionist/Junior Accountant

Ellen has been working with The Lavin Agency since 2014. Originally from Kingston, Ontario, she now calls Toronto her home. A food lover and avid traveler, you can catch her daydreaming what her next meal or travel destination would be, always looking for new and different experiences.

Joy Kim

Senior Accountant (On Leave)

Joy is a Senior Accountant at Lavin and has been a part of the Lavin family since 2006. In her spare time she enjoys theatre, all things food and spending time with her husband, two children and dog.

  • faq

An Interview with David Lavin

Please enjoy this candid interview with David Lavin. I was interested in talking about the history and philosophy of the agency. At one point, I asked David about what motivates him, what keeps him going, even after more than two decades. He smiled, and said, “Why waste even an hour of your life?” Exactly.

—CHARLES YAO, Executive Vice President/Director of Intellectual Talent 


  • How do you see The Lavin Agency in relation to other speaking agencies?

    We are definitely the outsiders of the speakers business. When I go to the speaking industry association, I realize that we’re not in the same business as everybody else. Everybody else is in the business of giving their clients what they ask for. I’m in the business of trying to anticipate the zeitgeist. My job is to know who is hot next year, and why, and book that. That’s my job, that’s what makes it interesting to me. 

  • Let’s face it, there are probably a hundred thousand speaking events booked in North America every year. We book 1,600 of them, which is not a lot. It’s a lot for us—and maybe we can book two thousand, or three thousand, but even with three thousand out of a hundred thousand, I can still just concentrate on working with good speakers. I don’t have to do the other 97%. I can work with the 3% of clients who really get it, who want to do something of fundamental value for their organization, and not the 97% who just want to fill a slot with a speaker and move on.


  • How did your early life inform what you do today?

    Nobody grows up thinking, “I can hardly wait to be a lecture agent,” and I was no different. I didn’t know what I wanted to be, and I didn’t know what a speaking agent was. I spent my youth traveling around the world. I was Canada’s youngest chess master. I took my college grant money and went to California. I lived in Paris, San Francisco, Vancouver, London and Berlin. Even Ibiza. I talked to a lot of people, learned a lot of things, and I read thousands of books.


  • Then what?

    I came back to Toronto, and settled down. I started thinking about what I was going to do with my life. Then I started thinking, “What am I going to do tonight?” Do I want to go to The Horseshoe [a local club] and see a band? Not really. Is there a movie I want to see? There wasn’t. I didn’t own a TV. I refused to own a TV set until I was 30. So, I looked at my bookshelf and thought, “I want to go see Hunter S. Thompson give a speech.” But he wasn’t giving a speech. So I decided to make it happen. Somehow, I contacted Hunter S. Thompson to come to Toronto. He was here for a week, and a few hours before he was scheduled to go on, he left town. We were completely sold out. 1,200 seats! I was standing in front of the theatre, telling people it was sold out, that he was not here, but people were still trying to buy tickets. They wanted a souvenir!

    Later, I managed to track Hunter down, and he came back three weeks later and did two shows. It was also the worst storm of the year, so he was an hour and a half late. As soon as he stepped onto the stage I collapsed in sheer joy. I was just so glad he was actually there. I swore I would never do something like that again. There was a journalist covering it, who came up to me and said, “You have no idea what you've pulled off. I’ve never seen anyone deal with pressure the way you have.” I had no idea at the time that it was going to turn into a 20-year career. It’s turned out okay, though.
  • So, with one event behind you, what happened next?


    I put together a lecture series and went to the Toronto Star and said, “How would you like to sponsor me?” I was twenty-seven, I’d never done anything like this before, and the Star was the biggest paper in the country. They came back and said, “Yes, we’re going to sponsor your speaking series.” Over three years, they gave me $1 million in ad space, and I thought, “Oh, I guess people just give ambitious 27 year-olds a million dollars.” They gave me complete editorial control. We brought in people like Noam Chomsky, Abbie Hoffman, Timothy Leary, and Eldridge Cleaver. We had great events and got between 1,200 and 1,700 people for every one.


  • How did that series turn into an actual full-fledged speaking agency?


    Well, being a promoter is great. But you make $10,000 one day and lose $10,000 the next. It wears thin. You can only do so many events. We were doing ten events a year, and that was the limit of what we could do. I had been doing it for three years and the person I was working with at the Toronto Star passed away, tragically. He completely understood what we were trying to do, and was happy to sit back and watch us go. With a kid on the way, I decided I needed to move on. That was the beginning of The Lavin Agency.


  • What was year one of The Lavin Agency like?


    The first year was tough. I made the mistake of doing what everyone else was doing. I said, “We have ten thousand speakers, tell me who you want and I’ll get them for you.” After a while I realized that was just a stupid way to do business. It made no sense. All of my assumptions were terrible, and I realized that all of the other business models that the other agencies were using didn’t work for me. I didn’t want to do what everyone else was doing; it wasn’t very intellectually stimulating. So I just started doing what I wanted to do, crossed my fingers, and hoped it would work. I started to look for speakers I believed in. I went out and found people that I thought were interesting—incredible people who, sometimes, had never given a speech before. Since nobody else thought to represent them, they were happy to be represented by us. So that’s what I did: I found interesting people and called up organizations and said, “These people are interesting, here’s why, and here’s what they’ll do for you. Here’s the fit.” Over a few years, we went from zero events to over 450 a year. 

    That first year was lean, but year two was okay, and year three was amazing. In fact, we’ve literally grown every year we’ve been in business.



  • What was the landscape of public speaking in those first few years of business?


    The public speaking scene was limited—not just here, but everywhere. I think what I did was I recognized something in lectures that others didn’t: that thinking is fun. That people who used to go to school and stay up until 5 o’clock in the morning to talk about philosophy and economics and politics miss those days. They love that sense of engagement. They love being able to go out to a lecture with friends, and then go away and talk about it. That’s what I think I picked up on—that people miss thinking.


  • Do you think you’ve had an influence on the public speaking world?


    We’ve been told that we revolutionized the industry, yes. I think that’s true. We changed all the rules. People now don’t even realize that the rules got changed. There’s still a lot to be done. This is a very fragmented industry and there are far too many speakers. 95% of the people who give speeches shouldn’t be giving speeches. Those people are doing it because they want to make money, not because they have ideas that are worth sharing. That’s one of the sad things about the speaking industry.


  • It’s one of my pet peeves, too. Why does this persist?

    Some of the event organizers simply don’t have the time to discern quality vs. the not-quality stuff. It’s not their fault. They’re busy people. It’s not their job. It’s our job. I read so many of these bogus resumes of popular speakers. If you look at their accomplishments from before they were speakers, it’s nothing. They’re just okay speakers who’ve written an okay book. And that book is just a rehash of 37 other books. They don’t have a single original idea, yet they make money speaking. I think that’s just sad.


  • Okay, then: what makes for a great keynote speaker?

    What makes a great speaker is actually pretty interesting. People always say they want a great speaker, but I think they have the wrong adjective. What they want is “compelling.” You want a speaker who is going to move an audience—who’s compelling. People too often want a speaker that jumps up and down, yelling, “You can be all you can be,” or they want a speaker who can tell a joke. They don’t recognize that the most compelling speakers genuinely have the most interesting ideas.

    What really motivates people is a solution to a problem that they’re having, not somebody yelling at an audience that, “You can sell!” People look for solutions. People look for content. One of the unfortunate things about the speaking industry is we’ve been in the placebo business for too long. Some other bureaus sell people crap, call it content, and hope it’ll make an organization more effective.



  • What’s the worst part about booking a bad keynote speaker?


    The most aggravating thing about seeing a bad speaker is knowing it was so unnecessary. You don't need bad speakers. In 2008, I was at our speaking industry conference and everyone was saying “times are tough.” But, at that time, our business was going up. One speaker got up and said he dropped his fee by half. I said, look, he didn’t drop his fee by half. If anything, he wasn’t worth what he was originally getting paid. The only reason he’d get $20,000 to give a speech was because all the good speakers were already booked. I liken it to those champagne towers you see in Las Vegas: these huge towers made up of glasses that get filled from the top. Well, in 2005, 2006, 2007, and even now, when times are better, there’s an unlimited amount of champagne, and all the glasses are getting filled—but they shouldn’t be. During the economic slump, the good speakers were getting booked as much as ever, but the bad ones disappeared. And I think it’s unfortunate that they’re back.


  • Where do you find good new speakers?


    Finding new speakers is incredibly difficult—and too easy. Because, first of all, there’s no lack of people who want to make $10,000 for a keynote. However, there is a lack of people who should make $10,000 a keynote. So we actually have to say “no” more often than we say “yes.” A lot more often. We might look at someone and say, “This is amazing, this is interesting.” But we have to ask if there are dozens of organizations that can benefit from this idea. If the answer is yes, we sign them. If a speaker has a great message, you, as an agent, are constantly trying to think, “Is this a great message I like personally, or a great message that can be expanded to fit different groups?” 

    A good speaker can come from all kinds of backgrounds: the arts, business, science, the humanitarian world. So you have to be aware of all kinds of things—you have to be culturally aware. You have to be a polymath. That’s what I like about this job. It plays to my strength—that I’m reasonably good at many things. I know enough about economics that I can listen to a speech and say whether something is on the cutting edge or not. I don’t know enough about economics to write a paper, but I know enough to be a highly educated consumer. That’s what’s exciting, but it requires a lot of work. You have to read a lot, and talk to a lot of people, and get a lot of opinions. 

    One of the best ways to get new speakers is to ask people, “Who have you read or heard of lately that's interesting.”


  • How many event and meeting planners—the people who book speakers—do you try to talk to every day?


    I talk to dozens of people a day—it’s one of my favourite parts of the job. But I don’t talk to as many as I’d like to because everyone likes to use email. The only reasonable way to learn anything is to talk to someone. The best thing to do if you’re an organizer or an agent is to talk to each other. Email is a terrible form of communication. If email were invented first, we’d all be ecstatic that we had this new invention called the telephone, so we could talk to each other and accomplish in 5 minutes over the phone something that would take us three weeks over email.


  • What are event and meeting planners telling you today that’s different from 20 years ago?


    The questions always stay the same, but the answers are different. “How do you run a great company?” “How do you lead?” “How do you change?” “How do you help your community?” “How do you get other people to take the intrinsic talent in each of them, and go out and make a difference in the world?” All of these questions have been asked for dozens or even hundreds of years. It’s just the answers that change.


  • What motivates you to come into work every morning?


    What excites me during the day is knowing that even though I’ve done this job now for 23 years, I have no idea what’s going to happen on any given day. No idea who I’m going to talk to, what kind of fires I’m going to have to put out, no idea what things I’m going to build. Those bizarre little calls. Like a few years ago, I picked up the phone, and someone asked, “Is this David Lavin?” I said, “Yes.” The person said, “This is John. John Cleese. How are you?” Those are the magical moments. And they happen constantly throughout the week.


  • What keeps your enthusiasm high?


    A lot of things. First of all, it’s the intellectual stimulation. I was one of those people who stayed up all night long talking about “stuff.” Luckily I’m in an industry where I get to stay up late at night talking to interesting people about interesting things. So that’s one of the things. Secondly, I’m just very competitive. If you’re going to do something, you should do it better than the other person or you should at least try to. 

    If I’m going to run a speakers agency, I want to run the best speakers agency on the planet. That doesn’t mean it has to be the biggest—it just has to be the best. Big is secondary. I want to run an agency that I’m proud of and which provides the intellectual content that I think is critical, whether it’s for business or for culture. That’s the primary motivation. I think there are enough people out there who also want this high level content, so we can do well.



  • Do you ever think about, you know, slowing down?


    It’s just not part of my DNA. If I coasted on laurels, I wouldn’t have done this in the first place. Part of it is never being satisfied. I’m always asking myself, “Why did you do that? You should’ve done this, or this.” It’s like looking at a chess game. You don’t look at the games you won. You only look at the games you lose. You think, “What did I do wrong?” That’s what I do every day: I think, “What did I do wrong, and what can I do better tomorrow?” Why coast? Even if I wanted to, it wouldn’t be possible. Somebody asked me once, “What’s going to happen when you retire?” It’s an alien concept. In 20 years, I’ll still be doing something. Why waste even an hour of your life?


  • What’s on the horizon for the next decade of The Lavin Agency?


    There are fundamental problems in North America that need to be solved. I think education is a huge issue. The idea that people bankrupt themselves for an education for a job that pays them $30,000 a year is unsustainable. The healthcare debate, the energy debate—these are all discussions I think we need to be a part of. I look for keynote speakers who can provide solutions to those things, because we have severe problems that need advanced thinking. We’re not going to solve these problems with the same thinking that got us here. So that’s what's exciting—looking for people who actually have solutions, and working with them to get their solutions in front of as many people as possible.


  • More questions?
  • Call us at 1-800-265-4870. We'll take as much time as needed to make you an expert on booking speakers.